Flower Power News A Punany History for Our Lovers & Beginners

Flower Power News A Punany History for Our Lovers & Beginners

WHAT IS NEW?

 

The restrictions across the internet have been a devastating awakening for those who believe in freedom of speech. Jessica Holter felt the sting of censorship and public scrutiny as a teenaged journalist writing about drugs, AIDS, and date rape. She did not expect a red carpet when she introduced The Punany Project to her community in 1995 when she was only 25 years old. After all, she was supposed to be a nice, Christian Foster kid. She shares the rest of that story below. First, The Flower Power News of the day is that we have an arsenal of private social networking options for you among our collection of URLs. Jessica Holter and The Hip Team have been busy during the lockdown keeping our non-profit in service to you. 

 

LIVE ART EXHIBIT & SHOPS

The Shops at GGB - TheShopsatGGB.com

Ghetto Girl Blue - GhettoGirlBlue.com

Jessica Holter - JessicaHolter.com

 

SOCIAL SITES

Boi Girl - BoiGirl.com

She Slide - SheSlide.com

Lez Bois - LezBois.com

Lez Boiz - LezBoiz.com

 

COFFY NETWORK

Coffy Talk - CoffyTalk.com

Coffy Talk Radio - CoffyTalkRadio.com

Coffy TV - CoffyTV.com

Coffy Love - CoffyLove.com

 

NON PROFIT & COMMUNITY

Hip Inc - HipInc.org

Voices of Foster Care - VoicesofFosterCare.com

ADOSNFT - ADOSNFT.com

 

PUNANY SITES

Punany Love - PunanyLove.com

Punany TV - PunanyTV.com

Punany Poets - PunanyPoets.com

Verbal Penetration Book - VerbalPenetrationBook.com

Punany's Playhouse - PunanysPlayhouse.com

 

Okay, back to the story, as Jessica tells it...

 

I have told my Punany story the same way for many years. I am so glad to be writing again and giving you new content through my blog and Flower Power Newsletter!

 

In 1995 I had already started putting an anthology of Black erotica together that had me feeling funny. It was a weird time, a lot like now. The Hip Hop community was seeing its first black moguls beginning to emerge. Women were all over it, ready to finally get that pedestal! Enter AIDS, a vicious little virus that had come along to scare us up off of the dick. 

 

I was a journalist and could not think of a purpose for Black erotica beyond vanity and arousal. I debated the pros and cons of unfiltered media content, weighing the efforts of C Dolores Tucker, the opinions of Dr. Shaharazad Ali, and the confessions of Mya Angelou. I read in one of her novels that she had been a prostitute once. Motherhood saved her. As best I can recall, without Googling, the woman who was watching her son had stolen him while Mya was off in a house of ill repute, hustling for her new lover. The old gambler who had tricked her into outsmarting her pussy, let her go to find her son. 

 

I remember thinking it was a shame that when they chose to bring her story to life on television, we were left with a vision of Angelou only as a voluntary mute, punishing her tongue for causing the death of the man who molested her. Even in the later novels, Angelou was very forgiving and gentle with men. I could identify with her. I was raised in the church by a woman who was very much 'a lady.' When Mya describes her white-gloved outfit as she boards the train from the Bay to LA, I could picture the Mother's Board at my childhood church, white gloves serving Welches Grape Juice for wine. 

 

The incomplete story of Mya Angelou absolves her of sexual responsibility and power. Her legacy sits high on a shelf in literary history where her pride and grace overcomes her past. I will go as far as to say that Black women are encouraged to suffer and overcome. In our first edition of Punany The Hip Hop Psalms, Poet and Photographer Dayna Gaspard hit the conversation on the head when she asks, 'Were is my fucking pedestal?' 

 

One day I read an article that reported Black women were 23 percent of the newly diagnosed AIDS cases. Not long after, Eazy E sent a warning from his death bed, 'This thing is real... it does not discriminate.' It was like a sign from God. NWA had been the catalyst for misogyny in our culture. Under their worldwide musical vibration Black women were immortalized in history as bitches, hoes, and gold diggers. I saw this as an opportunity to address sexual health for women in a book laser-focused on the Black female body. Punany The Hip Hop Psalms would be for the growing community of young women who looked to popular music and videos to learn about sexuality and feminine power.

 

The Punany Project became a complete book with a music soundtrack by Dwayne Wiggins of Tony Yoni Tone'! and Lev Berlak of The Grill. To sell an independently published book, Holter and some very talented contributors to the anthology and the soundtrack started producing shows at a small club in Oakland under a joint production with Dwayne Wiggins called The Coffy Shop. Replete with dance, comedy, poetry, and erotic theme, Holter developed a theater show based on book content. Bring in the Noise, Bring in the Funk popularity gave me hopes of getting on a college tour, but after I let HBO put me in that house of ill-repute, I had Black student union protests. I might have been too hot for a college tour, but The Punany Poets reached academic acclaim in the UCLA Ph.D. Dissertation U.E.A.T. Urban Erotic Activist Theater Representing the Forbidden by Dr. Raquel Monroe. 

 

I am looking forward to seeing you all again in February. Subscribe to our channel at PunanyTV.com. Watch our Valentine's show Pussy Willow from home for only $6.

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.